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[Les Lilas • France]

 

As part of an invitation from Université Paris 1 – Ecole des arts de la Sorbonne, l’Espace Khiasma had the pleasure of hosting the American anthropologue and theorist Elizabeth Povinelli, for an evening of discussion about recent films from the  Karrabing Film Collective.

Povinelli has been developing a collaboration with an indigenous community from North Australia, who have been at the root of her most ambitious research, for a number of years. Together with the Karrabing Film Collective, they have invented a unique and eccentric cinematographic space, playing skillfully with satire, foiling the officiel History and laws of the Australian state, so as to defend their identity and claim their rights and the power of their imagination.

 

Throughout the course of the evening, in which two films had been screened- Wutharr, Saltwater Dreams (2016, 28:53)  The Jealous One (2017, 29:17) and  the collective’s most recent opus, Night Time Go, will be evoked, Elizabeth Povinelli has been in conversation with Louis Henderson and Olivier Marboeuf discussing collective practices used in cinema, issues surrounding transmission and invention of new systems of Historical narrative based on the experiences and languages of minorities.

Elizabeth Povinelli : « The Rise of Extimate Aesthetics »

[Paris • France]

 

The third lecture begins with the Fanon’s Wretched of the Earth—colonized, subaltern, black and brown, the Indigenous and others who make their way through the toxic spacings of radical risk, trudging between work that doesn’t pay and dwellings that cannot be inhabited, swamps that cannot be sustained or drained—in order to reexamine the concept of the cultic in aesthetic theory and the function of art in western philosophies of truth. Acting as a concluding discussion of politics and arts in the wake of the toxic earth, “The Rise of Extimate Aesthetics,” argues that what is needed is not a new account of art, aesthetics, and artists, but an accounting of how all three contribute to the maintenance and extension of an enchanted politics of toxic sovereignty and how new form extimate aesthetics may be emerging within and against it.

 

Elizabeth A. Povinelli is Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University where she has also been the Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Law and Culture. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Yale University in 1991. She is the author of numerous books and essays as well as a former editor of the academic journal Public Culture.

Conférence enregistré dans le cadre d'une série de rencontres avec Elizabeth Povinelli, organisé par Université Paris 1 – Ecole des arts de la Sorbonne. Enregistré le 20 mars 2018 au Reid Hall – Columbia Center à Paris.

Elizabeth Povinelli : « The Collapse of Political Concepts »

[Paris • France]

 

This second lecture begins with four axioms that emerge when politics enters the interstitial spacing among the whole earth, gaia, and autonomous worlds. The four axioms are: the extimacy of existence; the collapse of western distinctions and hierarchies of existence, most signi cantly that between Life and Nonlife, the biological and geological; the distribution of the effects of power and the power to affect a given terrain of existence; and the multiplicity and collapse of forms of the event. How does the straining of quasi-spaces and fuzzy things and of the efforts and forces of embankment of existence demand an accounting from western political concepts for their refusal to register their historical and current effects on the toxic earth?

 

Elisabeth Povinelli is professor in anthropology at Columbia University (New York). Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise. Informed primarily by the traditions of American pragmatism and continental immanent theory and grounded in the circulation of values, materialities, and socialities. This potential theory has unfolded primarily from within a sustained relationship with Indigenous colleagues in north Australia and across five books, numerous essays, and four films with the Karrabing Film Collective. Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism was the 2017 recipient of the Lionel Trilling Book Award. Karrabing films were awarded the 2015 Visible Award and the 2015 Cinema Nova Award Best Short Fiction Film, Melbourne International Film Festival and have shown internationally including in the Berlinale Forum Expanded, Sydney Biennale; MIFF, the Tate Modern, documenta-14, and the Contour Biennale.

Conférence enregistré dans le cadre d'une série de rencontres avec Elizabeth Povinelli, organisé par Université Paris 1 – Ecole des arts de la Sorbonne. Enregistré le 6 mars 2018 au Reid Hall – Columbia Center à Paris.

[Paris • France]

 

Pivoted between Hannah Arendt’s The Human Condition and a group of mermaids in a recent Karrabing Film Collective work, “The Return of the World” begins a discussion of the toxic earth by distinguishing among a whole earth, gaia (gr. life; female progenitor of life), and autonomous worlds. How does toxicity give lie to all three? The term “return” in the lecture title might suggest something that was once part of western theory was left behind or lost but has now come back as if a prodigal son. But what is returning, what never left, and where? What if the mermaids never vanished with the assault of colonizing modern, nor returned because of rationality’s disenchantment? What if the mermaids have continued to move across the landscape even as the specificities of their journeys were altered by the toxic actions of colonialism, industrialism, and their value extractions? In other words, how do the imagines of the whole earth, autonomous worlds, and gaia cover over as much as they reveal about large segments of existence which were never enchanted or disenchanted rather, as the African American filmmaker, Charles Burnett, put it in relation to his film The Killer of Sheep, fighting to preserve and endure in a constantly altering terrain of toxic racism and settler colonialism

 

Elisabeth Povinelli is professor in anthropology at Columbia University (New York). Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise. Informed primarily by the traditions of American pragmatism and continental immanent theory and grounded in the circulation of values, materialities, and socialities. This potential theory has unfolded primarily from within a sustained relationship with Indigenous colleagues in north Australia and across five books, numerous essays, and four films with the Karrabing Film Collective. Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism was the 2017 recipient of the Lionel Trilling Book Award. Karrabing films were awarded the 2015 Visible Award and the 2015 Cinema Nova Award Best Short Fiction Film, Melbourne International Film Festival and have shown internationally including in the Berlinale Forum Expanded, Sydney Biennale; MIFF, the Tate Modern, documenta-14, and the Contour Biennale.

Conférence enregistré dans le cadre d'une série de rencontres avec Elizabeth Povinelli, organisé par Université Paris 1 – Ecole des arts de la Sorbonne. Enregistré le 6 mars 2018 à Paris 1 – Ecole des arts de la Sorbonne