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[Les Lilas • France]

 

The Centre audiovisuel Simone de Beauvoir and its research group Travelling féministe, together with Espace Khiasma, are jointly organising a seminar on the dialogue, controversy and complex relations between Stuart Hall’s work, British cultural studies and transnational feminism over the last 30 years. The seminar will have the privilege to host filmmakers John Akomfrah and Lina Gopaul, founding members of the Black Audio Film Collective. John Akomfrah’s recent film, The Stuart Hall Project (2013), will be screened the evening preceding the seminar at MK2 Beaubourg cinema, thereby introducing several of the topics that will be at the heart of the discussion itself.The Centre audiovisuel Simone de Beauvoir and its research group Travelling féministe, together with Espace Khiasma, are jointly organising a seminar on the dialogue, controversy and complex relations between Stuart Hall’s work, British cultural studies and transnational feminism over the last 30 years. The seminar will have the privilege to host filmmakers John Akomfrah and Lina Gopaul, founding members of the Black Audio Film Collective. John Akomfrah’s recent film, The Stuart Hall Project (2013), will be screened the evening preceding the seminar at MK2 Beaubourg cinema, thereby introducing several of the topics that will be at the heart of the discussion itself.

 

Despite cultural studies’ analyses of how power is exercised through culture in general, the predominantly male scholars of the Birmingham School were hostile towards feminist critiques in the 1970s, a few years after the School had been established – so much so that feminists termed the topics that the Centre worked on as “boyzone”. At the same time, too few feminist movements attempted to articulate together the situations of white and racialised women. Their chief demands often universalised the social conditions of white middle-class women.

 

We would like to invite a small group of contemporary thinkers to build a conversation on the complex relations and mutual influences that transnational feminism and interdisciplinary Cultural Studies have held, especially within the research carried out by Stuart Hall and his colleagues from the mid-1960s onwards. How have Western and transnational feminists within cultural studies negotiated boundaries constructed by racialisation and the hegemony of whiteness? How has the work of Stuart Hall – who quickly became a significant intellectual reference for many of the British black arts movement’s artists and filmmakers in the 1980s and 90s – been read in relation to the concept of intersectionality that provides the foundation for decentring normative feminisms and challenging the white male as the normative subject of Western imagination? What strategies can be found, within the transversal practices of collectives bringing together artists, activists and academics in the 1980s black arts movement, to resist individualising tendencies within contemporary art and find the inspiration to build future alliances?

 

Recorded at Espace Khiasma, 10th June 2016.
Mixed by Esther Porylès

Production: Khiasma, Centre Simone de Beauvoir (Travelling féministe), with the support of INHA.

Proposed by Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, in collaboration with Lotte Arndt and Olivier Marboeuf.
With John Akomfrah and Lina Gopaul (filmmakers and producers / Smoking Dogs), Elsa Dorlin (researcher and professor, Paris 8), Nana Adusei-Poku (researcher and professor at Rotterdam University), Jamika Ajalon (artist, musician, poet), Sophie Orlando (researcher, Black Artists and Modernism laboratory, Chelsea/Middlesex University), Françoise Vergès (Global South(s) chair at the Collège d’études mondiales, FMSH, Paris), Lotte Arndt (theorician and professor at the École Supérieure d’Art et Design de Valence) and Sonia Khurana (artist).

Discussions moderated by Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez (curator and writer for l’Internationale online), Lotte Arndt, Olivier Marboeuf and Giovanna Zapperi (art historian, professor at the école nationale supérieure d’Art de Bourges).

Beyond division lines. Transnational feminism and cultural studies. 3/4

[Les Lilas • France]

 

The Centre audiovisuel Simone de Beauvoir and its research group Travelling féministe, together with Espace Khiasma, are jointly organising a seminar on the dialogue, controversy and complex relations between Stuart Hall’s work, British cultural studies and transnational feminism over the last 30 years. The seminar will have the privilege to host filmmakers John Akomfrah and Lina Gopaul, founding members of the Black Audio Film Collective. John Akomfrah’s recent film, The Stuart Hall Project (2013), will be screened the evening preceding the seminar at MK2 Beaubourg cinema, thereby introducing several of the topics that will be at the heart of the discussion itself.The Centre audiovisuel Simone de Beauvoir and its research group Travelling féministe, together with Espace Khiasma, are jointly organising a seminar on the dialogue, controversy and complex relations between Stuart Hall’s work, British cultural studies and transnational feminism over the last 30 years. The seminar will have the privilege to host filmmakers John Akomfrah and Lina Gopaul, founding members of the Black Audio Film Collective. John Akomfrah’s recent film, The Stuart Hall Project (2013), will be screened the evening preceding the seminar at MK2 Beaubourg cinema, thereby introducing several of the topics that will be at the heart of the discussion itself.

 

Despite cultural studies’ analyses of how power is exercised through culture in general, the predominantly male scholars of the Birmingham School were hostile towards feminist critiques in the 1970s, a few years after the School had been established – so much so that feminists termed the topics that the Centre worked on as “boyzone”. At the same time, too few feminist movements attempted to articulate together the situations of white and racialised women. Their chief demands often universalised the social conditions of white middle-class women.

 

We would like to invite a small group of contemporary thinkers to build a conversation on the complex relations and mutual influences that transnational feminism and interdisciplinary Cultural Studies have held, especially within the research carried out by Stuart Hall and his colleagues from the mid-1960s onwards. How have Western and transnational feminists within cultural studies negotiated boundaries constructed by racialisation and the hegemony of whiteness? How has the work of Stuart Hall – who quickly became a significant intellectual reference for many of the British black arts movement’s artists and filmmakers in the 1980s and 90s – been read in relation to the concept of intersectionality that provides the foundation for decentring normative feminisms and challenging the white male as the normative subject of Western imagination? What strategies can be found, within the transversal practices of collectives bringing together artists, activists and academics in the 1980s black arts movement, to resist individualising tendencies within contemporary art and find the inspiration to build future alliances?

 

Recorded at Espace Khiasma, 10th June 2016.
Mixed by Esther Porylès

Production: Khiasma, Centre Simone de Beauvoir (Travelling féministe), with the support of INHA.

Proposed by Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, in collaboration with Lotte Arndt and Olivier Marboeuf.
With John Akomfrah and Lina Gopaul (filmmakers and producers / Smoking Dogs), Elsa Dorlin (researcher and professor, Paris 8), Nana Adusei-Poku (researcher and professor at Rotterdam University), Jamika Ajalon (artist, musician, poet), Sophie Orlando (researcher, Black Artists and Modernism laboratory, Chelsea/Middlesex University), Françoise Vergès (Global South(s) chair at the Collège d’études mondiales, FMSH, Paris), Lotte Arndt (theorician and professor at the École Supérieure d’Art et Design de Valence) and Sonia Khurana (artist).

Discussions moderated by Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez (curator and writer for l’Internationale online), Lotte Arndt, Olivier Marboeuf and Giovanna Zapperi (art historian, professor at the école nationale supérieure d’Art de Bourges).